Here is a website that would be useful to help find practice A.P exam questions.

http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/members/exam/exam_information/2001.html



Here are some sample essay questions from the Collegeboard website to test your knowledege.

2009 AP
® ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS
© 2009 The College Board. All rights reserved.
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Question 3
(Suggested time—40 minutes. This question counts for one-third of the total essay section score.)
Adversity has the effect of eliciting talents which in prosperous circumstances would have lain dormant.
—Horace
Consider this quotation about adversity from the Roman poet Horace. Then write an essay that defends, challenges, or qualifies Horace’s assertion about the role that adversity (financial or political hardship, danger, misfortune, etc.)Plays in developing a person’s character. Support your argument with appropriate evidence from your reading, observation, or experience.



2009 AP® ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS
ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION
SECTION II
Total time—2 hours
Question 1

(Suggested time—40 minutes. This question counts for one-third of the total essay section score.)
Directions: The following prompt is based on the accompanying eight sources.
This question requires you to synthesize a variety of sources into a coherent, well-written essay. When you
synthesize sources, you refer to them to develop your position and cite them accurately.Your argument should
be central; the sources should support the argument. Avoid merely summarizing sources.
Remember to attribute both direct and indirect references.

Introduction

Explorers and tales of explorations tend to capture the human imagination. However, such explorations have
financial and ethical consequences. Space exploration is no exception.

Assignment

Read the following sources (including the introductory information) carefully.Then, in an essay that synthesizes
at least three of the sources, develop a position about what issues should be considered most important in
making decisions about space exploration.

You may refer to the sources by their titles (Source A, Source B, etc.) or by the descriptions in parentheses.

Source A (Livingston)
Source B (Photo)
Source C (Chamberlain)
Source D (NIH)
Source E (McLean)
Source F (Greenberg)
Source G (Collins)
Source H (Roberts)



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2009 AP® ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS

Source A
Livingston, David. “Is Space Exploration Worth theCost?” 21 Jan. 2008.
The Space Review: Essays and Commentary About the Final Frontier.
4 Mar 2008 http://www.thespacereview.com/article/1040/1.

The following is from the Web page of a person dedicated to space travel.


In my opinion, the manned space exploration program is absolutely worth the cost. The money spent on manned
space exploration is spent right here on Earth and most of it is spent in the US. We do not yet have a Bank of the
Milky Way, the First International Bank of Mars, or a Lunar Mutual Savings and Loan. The money that is spent goes
to manufacturing, research and development, salaries, benefits, insurance companies, doctors, teachers, scientists,
students, blue- and white-collar workers, and corporations and businesses both large and small. The money disperses
throughout the economy in the same way as money spent on medical research, building houses, or any other activity
we engage in with government or even private spending.
We have our work cut out for us as we move forward in this new century. We don’t seem to get along well with each
other here on Earth, but we do quite well in space. Space is our model for all nations. Notice how many more nations
are talking about and wanting to get into the manned space act. India, Russia, China, Japan, and the European Space
Agency, for starters, all want a manned mission to the Moon and it won’t stop there. These countries and agencies
know that manned space exploration builds wealth for their nation, solves problems and enhances life for their
people right here on Earth, and shows us the way for how we can all live together in peace.
Manned space exploration is absolutely worth the investment. It’s not just about what we learn out there in space, or
about ourselves, or how to be a better steward of precious Earth. It’s about how we live here on Earth together and
what type of future we want for ourselves and children. Manned space exploration is the path to how we build a
better life for ourselves here on Earth, and how we can give hope and provide inspiration for our youngsters to grow
up, do the schoolwork, and accept the challenges that await them to make our world even better. Whatever we spend
on manned space exploration is a bargain and our investment will be returned to us many times over, both
quantitatively and qualitatively.
The Space Review

© 2008 Used by permission of Dr. David Livingston, www.thespaceshow.com.

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